KabiCare Patient Support Program forHypoglycemia (Low Blood Sugar)

Glucagon Emergency Kit

The Glucagon Emergency Kit from Fresenius Kabi is an FDA-approved and cost-effective alternative to treat severe hypoglycemic episodes in people with diabetes.

Learn more about Glucagon Emergency Kit.

Important Safety Information

Program Support Areas

Fresenius Kabi, through its KabiCare Patient Support Program, is focused on helping you care for your patients with diabetes who experience unexpected episodes of severe hypoglycemia. Explore the support programs available with Glucagon Emergency Kit.

Financial Support

Commercial Copay Support

If your patient has commercial or private insurance, they may be eligible* for the copay program that lowers their out-of-pocket costs to

as little as $5/month for treatment with an annual maximum. For more information, contact KabiCare (1.833.522.4227)

Download the Glucagon Emergency Kit Savings Card*

* Eligibility criteria apply. Patients are not eligible for commercial copay assistance support if the prescription is eligible to be reimbursed, in whole or in part, by any state or federal healthcare program.

Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Sugar) Resources

Discover the resources available from Fresenius Kabi for patients who are prescribed Glucagon:

Be in the Know

Don’t let the low sneak up. For patients with diabetes, blood sugar can drop very low without warning. Here are some tools and resources available to share with your patients: Glucagon Tools and Resources

Training Kit

For U.S. Healthcare Professionals Only

Fresenius Kabi provides complimentary injection kits to healthcare professionals, which does not include the active ingredient. To receive a complimentary injection training kit to help educate your patients, please visit the Glucagon site.

Information for Caregivers

The Glucagon Emergency Kit website offers a concise overview of how to respond to a severe hypoglycemic episode.

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INDICATIONS AND USAGE
Glucagon for Injection is an antihypoglycemic agent indicated for the treatment of severe hypoglycemia in pediatric and adult patients with diabetes.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
Glucagon for Injection is contraindicated in patients with pheochromocytoma, insulinoma, or a known hypersensitivity to glucagon or any of the excipients.

Catecholamine Release in Patients with Pheochromocytoma: Glucagon for Injection is contraindicated in patients with pheochromocytoma because Glucagon for Injection may stimulate the release of catecholamines from the tumor.

Hypoglycemia in Patients with Insulinoma: In patients with insulinoma, administration may produce an initial increase in blood glucose; however, Glucagon for Injection may stimulate exaggerated insulin release from an insulinoma and cause hypoglycemia. If a patient develops symptoms of hypoglycemia after a dose of Glucagon for Injection, give glucose orally or intravenously.

Hypersensitivity and Allergic Reactions: Allergic reactions have been reported and include generalized rash, and in some cases anaphylactic shock with breathing difficulties, and hypotension.

Lack of Efficacy in Patients with Decreased Hepatic Glycogen: Glucagon for Injection is effective in treating hypoglycemia only if sufficient hepatic glycogen is present. Patients in states of starvation, with adrenal insufficiency or chronic hypoglycemia may not have adequate levels of hepatic glycogen for Glucagon for Injection to be effective. Patients with these conditions should be treated with glucose.

Necrolytic Migratory Erythema (NME): a skin rash, has been reported postmarketing following continuous glucagon infusion and resolved with discontinuation of the glucagon. Should NME occur, consider whether the benefits of continuous glucagon infusion outweigh the risks.

Most common adverse reactions (>5% or greater incidence): Injection site swelling, injection site erythema, vomiting, nausea, decreased blood pressure, asthenia, headache, dizziness, pallor, diarrhea, and somnolence.

To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Fresenius Kabi USA, LLC at 1-800-551-7176, option 5, or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.

Beta-blockers: Patients taking beta-blockers may have a transient increase in pulse and blood pressure.

Indomethacin: In patients taking indomethacin Glucagon for Injection may lose its ability to raise glucose or may produce hypoglycemia.

Warfarin: Glucagon for Injection may increase the anticoagulant effect of warfarin.

This Important Safety Information does not include all the information needed to use Glucagon for Injection safely and effectively. Please see accompanying full prescribing information for Glucagon for Injection. Full prescribing information is also available at www.fresenius-kabi.com/us.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE
Glucagon for Injection is an antihypoglycemic agent indicated for the treatment of severe hypoglycemia in pediatric and adult patients with diabetes.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
Glucagon for Injection is contraindicated in patients with pheochromocytoma, insulinoma, or a known hypersensitivity to glucagon or any of the excipients.

Catecholamine Release in Patients with Pheochromocytoma: Glucagon for Injection is contraindicated in patients with pheochromocytoma because Glucagon for Injection may stimulate the release of catecholamines from the tumor.

Hypoglycemia in Patients with Insulinoma: In patients with insulinoma, administration may produce an initial increase in blood glucose; however, Glucagon for Injection may stimulate exaggerated insulin release from an insulinoma and cause hypoglycemia. If a patient develops symptoms of hypoglycemia after a dose of Glucagon for Injection, give glucose orally or intravenously.

Hypersensitivity and Allergic Reactions: Allergic reactions have been reported and include generalized rash, and in some cases anaphylactic shock with breathing difficulties, and hypotension.

Lack of Efficacy in Patients with Decreased Hepatic Glycogen: Glucagon for Injection is effective in treating hypoglycemia only if sufficient hepatic glycogen is present. Patients in states of starvation, with adrenal insufficiency or chronic hypoglycemia may not have adequate levels of hepatic glycogen for Glucagon for Injection to be effective. Patients with these conditions should be treated with glucose.

Necrolytic Migratory Erythema (NME): a skin rash, has been reported postmarketing following continuous glucagon infusion and resolved with discontinuation of the glucagon. Should NME occur, consider whether the benefits of continuous glucagon infusion outweigh the risks.

Most common adverse reactions (>5% or greater incidence): Injection site swelling, injection site erythema, vomiting, nausea, decreased blood pressure, asthenia, headache, dizziness, pallor, diarrhea, and somnolence.

To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Fresenius Kabi USA, LLC at 1-800-551-7176, option 5, or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.

Beta-blockers: Patients taking beta-blockers may have a transient increase in pulse and blood pressure.

Indomethacin: In patients taking indomethacin Glucagon for Injection may lose its ability to raise glucose or may produce hypoglycemia.

Warfarin: Glucagon for Injection may increase the anticoagulant effect of warfarin.

This Important Safety Information does not include all the information needed to use Glucagon for Injection safely and effectively. Please see accompanying full prescribing information for Glucagon for Injection. Full prescribing information is also available at www.fresenius-kabi.com/us.